St. Patrick’s Home of Ottawa

The Chapel at St. Pat's Long Term Care in Ottawa.

The Gathering Place at St. Patrick’s Home in Ottawa

St. Patrick’s Home (St. Pat’s) has been an Ottawa pillar for more than 144 years and is recognized as a community leader in the long term-care of the elderly.  In August 2007, the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care awarded St. Patrick’s Home 96 additional beds.  This led to a redevelopment plan that would also see the reconstruction of the existing facility.

Wendy Brawley led a team from Barry J. Hobin and Associates Architects as they began the process of redesigning St. Pat’s to meet specific Ontario provincial criteria for long-term care facilities.  Now, more than six years after they began, the new St. Pat’s facility is complete.  Residents rang in a new year in a new home, moving into the new facility on December 30 and 31st, 2013.

Through Wendy, and others at Barry J. Hobin and Associates Architects, the St. Pat’s project profits from extensive knowledge in the redevelopment of long-term care facilities that goes well beyond design elements to include experience and familiarity with not-for-profit processes to leverage fundraising and expand budget reach.

“The process—from start to finish—can take a long time. In this case almost 7 years.” explains Wendy, “Facility staff and Board members can move on, but our knowledge and input remains consistent, even as other resources transition and provincial criteria and technology evolve.”

Wendy, a partner with Barry J. Hobin and Associates, has gained significant expertise with the management of institutional, committee and community driven projects like St. Pat’s, where consultants, stakeholders and complex municipal and provincial approval processes are the norm.

“Because of our experience, we’re able to lend assistance to focus the project and keep it on track during approvals, committee and board intervention and beyond” Wendy continues.

Wendy currently sits on the Corporate Redevelopment sub-committee; this committee is looking at opportunities with partnerships for the development of the remaining lands in a way that will further enhance the St. Patrick’s Home campus.

 

Building Relationships that Shape our City

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Westboro Station, Ottawa

 

We often take the buildings that line our city streets for granted, seldom if ever considering the story behind each new commercial or residential development that shapes the landscape of our community. As residents and passersby, we reap the benefits of carefully crafted structures, created by talented architects, builders and developers to serve a purpose – or collection of objectives – beyond what we might imagine.

It is in that stage of vision and imagination that the relationship between architect and developer begins, evolves and remains a vital and constant element of each project – from conception to completion.

When Morley-Hoppner began the process of creating a state-of-the-art residential and commercial development that would ultimately frame the South-West border of Westboro, they trusted in the Ottawa architecture firm of Barry J. Hobin and Associates. What they created there became Westboro Station, an attractive wedge-shaped, multi-phase condo development with street-level commercial units, designed to highlight its position and create a gateway into the bustling neighbourhood.

As with any relationship, each player makes their own distinct contribution to its success. Savvy developers know the key to commercial success and viability is a well-designed (and executed) building. Good architecture considers the context, site conditions, target audience/buyer and the ultimate price point as part of the design process – going beyond innovation to ensure that the developer’s vision is fulfilled within the unique characteristics of the neighbourhood the developer has carefully chosen.

In new home and low-rise condo communities, builders will often adapt to existing designs but, working with an architecture firm who understands the project’s goals, and shares in an overall vision for the cityscape means that, although initial costs may be higher for the developer, the final product will stand out.  Consumers will become part of a community that has been designed to benefit its neighbourhood, carefully considering its location and streetscape.

As a vision for Morley-Hoppner’s new low-rise condo development in Beaverbrook began to take shape, they again looked to Barry J. Hobin and Associates, a relationship now tried and true.  Hobin, in turn, provided a 7 storey condominium building. Two The Parkway has been designed to suit consumers who are looking for a home that is unique and requires little maintenance, while allowing them to remain in the Kanata neighbourhood they have grown to love.  The Hobin team also provided innovative designs for common spaces including the lobby, the lounge, the outdoor terrace and the gym.

Initially envisioned as a 16 storey building, Morley-Hoppner and Hobin revised the design early in the process in order to make the project better suited to the scale of the neighbourhood. At a cost far below what a similar condo might cost in the heart of the city, the Two the Parkway project has already sold multiple units – pre-construction.

Next on the Hobin/Morley-Hoppner drawing board? The restoration of an old school at 12 Stirling Avenue in Hintonburg into smart and attractive lofts and condos.

Working with an architect brings a level of sophistication and uniqueness to each commercial, residential or condominium project and ensures flawless execution of the developer’s vision. An architect whose reputation for excellence in both design and project execution, lends to the credibility of the project and to building a relationship with a committed developer that, by combining form and function, will build a community.

Oakwood Corporate Headquarters

OakwoodHQWith more than 58 years of experience providing superior quality home renovations to residents throughout the Ottawa area, OakWood Renovation Experts have begun to turn their expertise on a project closer to home.

When OakWood decided to build a new corporate headquarters, they opted to work with Barry J Hobin & Associates Architects, one of Canada’s most respected architectural firms, to design a space that would serve multiple objectives while incorporating sustainable green features and targeting LEED Platinum designation.

Why is OakWood pursuing LEED?

For four generations, OakWood has worked tirelessly to pursue standards of excellence; so when the company decided to build a new head office, integrating sustainability and targeting LEED Platinum became integral parts of the project goals. On a practical level, OakWood was also looking to achieve:

•             A healthier environment for its staff;

•             Lower operating costs;

•             A lower carbon footprint for the company;

•             3rd party validation of its design;

Construction and Sustainability

Since the late 1990’s (and since 2002 in Canada), the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating systems have been redefining the way people think about the places they live, work and learn. LEED is a third-party certification program and an internationally accepted benchmark for the design, construction and operation of high performance green buildings. As an internationally recognized mark of excellence, it has transformed the way built environments are designed, constructed, and operated.

OakWood  is pursuing LEED Platinum status for this project, which will put it in elusive company with only 31 other projects in Canada having achieved such a prestigious level, and only 2 in Ottawa.

The new building will be counted along with OakWood’s 4 existing locations and consolidate head office operations and human resources. Beyond that, customers will have access to a state-of-the-art design and material Studio that will feature design concepts and ideas from around the world.

Once completed, the new headquarters will encourage customers to meet with OakWood’s certified in-house planning and design experts in a carefully imagined environment that is designed by the architectural team led by Barry J. Hobin and firm partner Gord Lorimer, to support brainstorming and creativity. The on-site showroom will feature a full range of concept and materials, detailed planning and project budgeting options, allowing customers to see their vision in an applied setting.

In addition, OakWood is taking advantage of this creative opportunity to create a technologically advanced building that will meet some of the highest energy and environmental standards in Canada.

The project is currently under construction at the Trim Road and Highway 174 location and is expected to be in move-in condition by Fall 2014.

Give Me Shelter

ShelterBoxBlogPicShelterBox Canada is an international disaster relief organization that provides access to emergency shelter, warmth and essential supplies to people affected by disaster, worldwide. A typical ShelterBox contains a family-size tent, blankets, water purification, cooking utensils, a camp-like stove, a tool kit, a children’s activity pack and other vital more. ShelterBox volunteers deliver the aid, working with other international organizations and local partners.

On February 27th, Barry J. Hobin and Associates Architects hosted an event at Divino Wine Studio in Ottawa in honour of clients for whom they have designed custom homes over the last 20+ years.  Though a smaller, niche group of clients within an architectural practice that impacts the cityscape with residential, commercial, intuitional and mixed-use designs, the connection seemed clear. Custom homes…shelter.

While key partners and staff were on hand for a celebration of our clients and their respectively unique home designs, we took a moment to reflect on our providence and invite our friends, clients and colleagues to consider supporting the ShelterBoxCanada initiative.

In the end and though not designed as a fundraising event, our evening raised the equivalent of approximately 12 Shelter Boxes, soon destined to provide disaster relief around the world.

More information about ShelterBox Canada is available at www.shelterboxcanada.org.

Making Room for Bluesfest House at the Former Westboro United Church

west facades_lowOttawa Folk Fest wasn’t the only addition to executive director Mark Monahan’s Bluesfest plate this year. Development work is currently underway at the site of the former Westboro United Church – making room for Bluesfest House, Ottawa Folk Fest, space for musical education in association with the Ottawa Folklore Centre, community meeting space, a small public performance space and Ravenhill Common (www.ravenhillcommon.com), an innovative infill housing development from Springcress.

This regeneration and adaptive reuse project was conceived in 2011 when Westboro United Church, built in 1913, was deconsecrated and entertained proposals to redevelop the site that would create a legacy project for the Church. Springcress Developments offered a proposal to retain the original Church and redesign the remainder of the site for a condominium project. Springcress Developments President David Spillenaar saw the potential of Bluesfest as an integral part of the rejuvenation project and recruited the Barry J. Hobin and Associates Architects team to design the residential and community aspects of the project, integrating the Bluesfest House concept.

Springcress donated the original Church to Bluesfest on the condition that its character be maintained.  Lead Bluesfest House architect  Bill Ritcey and his talented team are working to preserve heritage features within the Church while creating a new environment that is fitting for the cultural and community based facility. Fundraising and planning has been underway for the last 2 years as the industrious Bluesfest team took on the task of raising and securing funding to bring the Bluesfest House vision to fruition.  To date, more than $2 million of non-public funds have been secured.

For its part and developed by Springcress, Ravenhill Common will add 19 contemporary two and three bedroom brownstone townhomes, designed by Barry J. Hobin & Associates Architects. The townhouses will feature underground parking – an invaluable asset in the bustling Westboro neighbourhood. The homes have been designed with two-storey galleries, open lofts, private rear terraces and rooftop decks that combine modern elegance with the traditional character of the church structure and the surrounding community.

Building the Future

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From left to right: Patrick, Melanie, Todd, Louise, Rheal, Leila (Doug is absent)

 

 

 

 

 

The Barry J. Hobin name has long been synonymous with the built environment in Ottawa. Since Barry J. Hobin and Associates Architects Incorporated was established in 1979, the team has contributed an impressive range of structures within the institutional, recreational, commercial and residential sectors to the City of Ottawa and throughout Eastern Ontario.

As the firm evolves, the younger and newer members of the architectural and technical teams contribute to a diverse workforce that continues to influence the cityscape.  The firm has developed a notable collection of projects, taking pride in exceptional staff longevity while shaping a new generation of talent. Barry J. Hobin & Associates currently consists of 29 professional staff including six registered architects, several of whom are LEED® Accredited Professionals.

Our recent grads and developing architects include: Patrick Bisson (Equinelle Golf Club, Oakwood Head Office, The Bridge Church), Louise Cowley (Mutchmor Public School, Kanata Farm Boy), Todd Duckworth (Leonard Avenue historic renovation), Leila Emmrys (Lansdowne redevelopment, The Merit condo development), Rheal Labelle (Condo development at Pamilla and Rochester, Lansdowne redevelopment), Melanie Lamontagne (St. Patrick’s Home Long Term Care facility, Valour K-12 School), and Doug Van Den Ham (Redevelopment of vacated Bethany Hope space, Stirling Avenue condo development).  Along with these young professionals, our team continues to make significant contributions to our community landscape.

Habitat for Humanity National Capital Region

Barry Hobin crew Habitat for HumanityOn July 8th, a volunteer team of staff members from Barry J. Hobin & Associates Architects gave up a day of their own time to participate in a Habitat build  – adding priceless sweat equity to the Habitat for Humanity National Capital Region homes on Nantes Street in Orleans.

The build project has received financial support from Soloway Wright LLP, the Tachane Foundation and the family of Brian Bury as well as a wide range of volunteers from across the city. The 9 unit Habitat development has been designed by a Barry J. Hobin & Associates Architects to integrate into the existing neighbourhood. The design team included Gord Lorimer, Patrick Bisson, Karen Griffith and Alison Michelin.

Barry J. Hobin & Associates Architects support of Habitat for Humanity National Capital Region dates back to 1996.  Both Barry and Gord Lorimer have served on the Board of Directors, while Gord has also Chaired the Faith Relations Team and continues to participate in Habitat for Humanity mission builds around the world – most recently in El Salvador.

During his involvement in the design and approvals process, Patrick Bisson was inspired by the power of the Habitat community building philosophy. Patrick’s motivation was so infectious that he convinced 9 of his coworkers to give up a day of their own time and join him as volunteers on the build. Alowith Patrick, Doug, Gord, Kent, Corry, Karen, Scott, Patrick, Todd, Leila, and Marc -helped to build Habitat’s 41st, 42nd and 43rd homes in the National Capital Region.  These modest houses-a bungalow and 2 semi-detached units, will soon become home for three hard working low-income families.

World Habitat Awards Finalist – Beaver Barracks “CCOC” Barry J. Hobin & Associates Architects Inc.

_DSC5469-Edit aThe World Habitat Awards were established in 1985 as part of the United Nations International Year of Shelter for the Homeless to recognize projects that provided practical and innovative solutions to housing needs. The ten finalists for the 2013 World Habitat Awards have been chosen from a list of over 200 projects from around the world.  Among the finalists is the Centretown Citizens Ottawa Corporation’s (CCOC) Beaver Barracks development, a Barry J. Hobin and Associates design.

Beaver Barracks is a 254 unit affordable housing development with a strong emphasis on sustainable design. Located in Ottawa’s urban core, the development is organized around a central community garden framing it with buildings of varied scale and architectural form. The development offers a wide variety of housing options including ground related  town homes, special needs accessible units and apartments.

Beaver Barracks was designed with a focus on sustainability; using approximately 40% less energy than similar housing developments in the region and utilizing an underground geothermal system that provides highly efficient heating, cooling and hot water to every apartment and townhouse.

The World Habitat Awards will be announced in November 2013. More information is available at www.worldhabitatawards.org.

Salvation Army – Bethany Hope Centre

BJHA Bethany Hope CentreCome on in, we’re open!

The Barry J Hobin & Associates team is committed not only to providing leading edge design but to supporting community and non-profit organizations close to home, enriching the Ottawa landscape one building at a time.

On February 25th, we were on hand to see another BJHA community based project take flight as more than 150 people attended the official opening and ribbon cutting ceremony at the newly renovated Salvation Army Bethany Hope Centre in Ottawa.

The ceremonial event was officiated by Major Brenda Smith, Salvation Army Bethany Hope Centre Executive Director. Mayor Jim Watson – who also spoke – and Councilor Mark Taylor were on hand to cut the ribbon along with the young daughter of a Bethany Hope Centre client.

The BJHA team, initially engaged to provide a renovated structure for this community outreach facility, quickly became invested in its overall success and functionality, committing to ensuring optimal result within the firm budget requirements defined by this non-profit organization. The Salvation Army Bethany Hope Centre for Young Parents continues nearly a century’s tradition of providing service to pregnant and parenting youth and their children. The multi-service centre offers support to young parents 25 and under and their children 6 and under living within the Ottawa region.

Barry J. Hobin – Diamond Jubilee Medal Recipient

BJH Diamond JubileeDuring the Greater Ottawa Home Builders’ Association’s AGM early in March, Barry J. Hobin was among several recipients of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal, presented in recognition of outstanding commitment to the community.

Invited to share a brief statement, Barry said “I feel privileged to be able to create buildings for individual clients while contributing to the built landscape of the city of Ottawa. From the Jewish community campus to the Mission Hospice and the new St. Patrick’s home, each project allows us to interact with the leaders of our larger community and experience how design can serve a larger purpose.”

Other recipients included: Donna Hicks of Habitat for Humanity, Claude Des Rosiers of Boone Plumbing and Heating and Alan Cohen of Soloway Wright LLP.